Sunken Cities: Egypt’s Lost Worlds

Today opens at the British Museum a new and very interesting exhibition: Sunken Cities: Egypt’s Lost Worlds.

Sunken below the waters of the Mediterranean for over 1000 years, the cities of Thonis-Heracleion and Canopus as well as their recently recovered underwater treasures are the subject of this blockbuster exhibition.  Not to be missed if you’re in London between 19 May and 27 November.

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International Museum Day 2016

Happy International Museum Day!
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This year, the theme of ICOM’s International Museum Day is Museums and Cultural Landscapes.  Here is how the International Council of Museums describe this theme:

The theme Museums and Cultural Landscapes makes museums responsible for their landscapes, asking them to contribute knowledge and expertise and take an active role in their management and upkeep. The primary mission of museums is to oversee heritage, whether it be inside or outside their walls. Their natural vocation is to expand their mission and implement their own activities in the open field of cultural landscape and heritage that surrounds them and for which they can assume varying degrees of responsibility.  Highlighting the link between museums and cultural heritage enhances the idea of museums as territorial centres involved in actively protecting the cultural landscape.

You can download a pretty postcard to colour (similar to the poster above) right HERE!

Interview this morning

Yours truly gave an interview to WNCN (CBS) in the Egyptian galleries this morning. We talked about cool objects in the collection. It’s one of those things you do when you’re a curator.  I’ll share the details when I know at which time this will air.

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Picture taken by my colleague Emily K., Communications Manager at the Museum.

 

Perhaps a little more Egyptology than I thought…

I posted an addendum to yesterday’s post on La Vida Aegyptiaca. April was such a blur for me, I forgot to mention to very, very important Egyptological events!  Two photos below are evidence of a few more minutes of Egyptology…

 

So little time, so little Egyptology…

A new post has appeared on La Vida Aegyptiaca, my blog on the Society for the Study of Egyptian Antiquities (SSEA).  I have done very little Egyptology these last few months because, since January, I’m working on an exhibition that opens this October 1. (Yep, just 10 months to complete project that would normally be given 2 years.)  Take a look at my post using the link above… and keep in mind the image below.  That’s what I’ve been working on… there’s been so little Egyptology in my life since the New Year.  I take where I can…

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1936 Stout Scarab (detail)

 

Is archaeology a dangerous job?

Ah! A question about the dangers of archaeology.

Is archaeology a dangerous job?

Madaba5Yes and no. It depends on the country in which you work. Digging in a third world country where there is a civil war or harsh living conditions: yes, it is dangerous. Digging a First Nation site north of Toronto, barely half an hour away from your home: no, it is not. Still, like with any other job, you have to be careful and aware of your surroundings and take medical precautions to avoid illness.

The future of gallery teaching

This morning, I was in the NCMA’s Egyptian galleries teaching a class of students at Havelock High School (which is about 2 and half hours east of Raleigh)… using our very nifty SECU mobile distance learning cart.  The class had already 3D-printed a replica of the Amulet of Isis and Horus (which we scanned back in February) but they could see the original in the vitrine next to me as I talked about it.

We also chatted about Nehebkau (another amulet) and one of the school groups visiting the galleries with their art teacher stopped to listen to me… and then photobombed the lesson when they realised I was actually talking to other high school kids. It was hilarious… everyone was waving at each other… and Emily and I were laughing. Yes, ancient Egypt is that fun!

Thanks, Emily, for taking the pictures and manning the cart!