The Barberini Faun

My ARCHAEO-Crush for February is my favourite Classical sculpture of all times.

THE BARBERINI FAUN

Type: sculpture (marble)
Civilisation: Ancient Greece
Date: Hellenistic period, 323 -146 BCE (but could be a very high quality Roman copy)
ARCHAEO-Crush: I have always had a soft spot for marble statuary and this magnificent sculpture really amazed me when I first learned of it in art history class. Although partially restored during the 17th and 18th century (notably the legs, which were apparently not positioned quite as high), this is a masterpiece on several levels, including the execution. The position of the body is not only rather unusual, but also extremely challenging for a sculptor; the musculature is wonderful and remarkably detailed; the face is expressive; the sculpture is exquisite.
The blatant sexuality of the sculpture can be chocking to some, but in Greek art nudity was common-place and normal, part of the notions of Greek ideal. Despite the provocative pose, there is also a certain vulnerability to be found in this sculpture, a vulnerability that is just as enticing as the sleeping male, a vulnerability not often associated with men. I think that this vulnerability makes us forget that the youth sprawled on a panther skin on the rocks is not a man…
In fact, it is a faun or, more fitting for a Hellenistic statue, a satyr–a woodland creature from Greek mythology with equine features, notably horse tail and ears, and ithyphallic. (The faun of Roman mythology is half-man, half-goat with hairy legs and hooves, pointy ears and horns).  During Antiquity, the appearance of satyrs and fauns became more and more human-like and one must pay close attention to details to determine the identity of the subject. Here, the human legs of the youth belie its animal nature but a short tail is visible on the lower back and the pointy ears are hidden by the wreath of ivy. Yet the wreath is quite telling in and of itself… it is one of the symbols of Dionysos, the Greek god of wine, drunkenness, ritual madness, theatre and tragedy.  Satyrs are his randy, drinking companions.  The (terribly sexy) young satyr represented here is exhausted from excessive partying…
Bucket list status: I drop by the Glyptothek every time I am in Munich just to see this wonderful sculpture. And I’m usually not the only one spending long minutes staring at its wonderful physique.
Additional information:
The statue has the inventory number 218.  There is a post about the Barberini Faun on Khan Academy

 

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3 thoughts on “The Barberini Faun

  1. Dear Caroline,

    I am shocked and appalled to discover your fondness for boy-toys. Dear me! Before we know it, you’ll have married some young guy in Luxor – do they do that sort of thing down in Sudan as well? There certainly is a good contingent of British ladies quite happy to have their part-time husbands for a few months every year.

    gayle
    p.s. I’ve always thought that Faun would be more interested in our male colleagues . . .

    • I’m sure you’ll be relieved to learn that my boy-toys are made of marble or granite! Live specimens need to be more intellectually stimulating than brawny, and definitely less fond of fermented beverages than our friend the Faun! Talking about satyrs and fauns, the ones on our Greek pots at the museum seem to be rather interested in the nymphs!

  2. Caroline, you do have a way with words!! I did enjoy your almost poetic comments & I agree that it is a wonderful sculpture. Your review made me appreciate it more. Have you ever heard of Sister Wendy? She is a British nun who had a series on PBS years ago. She is an art historian who reviewed every kind of art w/o blushing & with humor.
    Irene L.

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