This IS the exhibition you’re looking for!

Earlier this afternoon, when I was doing research for a possible work trip to Naples, Italy, I came across this exhibition at the Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli:

The exhibition is about the mythology of heroes from Antiquity to Star Wars. (Brilliant, if you ask me…. the kid who thought that Alexander the Great was sort of an ancient Luke Skywalker–see an old post on the subject HERE.)  Unfortunately, the exhibition will be over by the time I make it to Naples in November, should the trip be possible (like said, exploring possibilities). The show closes on September 16.

Still, I was in stitches looking through the various photos of ancient art featuring Star Wars characters (some are more successful than others). Imagine, they used the same work of art I featured in my ‘Alexander Skywalker’ post… and added R2-D2 and BB8 to it. The MANN even had the guts to use some of the erotic art from Pompeii!!  (Talk about voyeuristic droids! These are not the droids you are looking for…)

My favourite are the two below. The geeks amongst you will enjoy the fact that you can download all these fun images from the exhibition website.

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Unexpected publication!

When I submitted a paper for a provenance workshop at the Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America in January 2017, I never expected a publication to come out it. I was just excited that my first presentation at an AIA meeting was actually held in Toronto (my old graduate stomping grounds) and that for once I knew where to go for lunch without Googling restaurants! (And, unlike so many, I knew how to dress for -20 Celsius weather!)

It was a pleasant surprise when our workshop moderator let us know that our session had been chosen (along with two others) for publication on the theme of collecting and collectors in the Selected Papers on Ancient Art and Architecture (SPAAA) series. (Contributions to that series are ‘by invitation only’ so this was very exciting.) I submitted the article version of my presentation and it was accepted by the peer review committee… and after a few months of delay the volume is now available!

Well, that was an unexpected publication… swiftly added to my CV!

In case you were wondering…

…Tut’s tomb has no hidden chambers after all.

The third radar scan of the pharaoh’s burial site conclusively shows that no additional mysteries lurk immediately behind its walls. You can read the National Geographic article by Kristin Romey and get the details.

If you’re not sure what this is all about, go back to my Has Nefertiti’s tomb been discovered? and Infrared thermography to be applied to Tutankhamun’s tomb posts of 2015.

A Symphony of Cultures

The British Museum’s . Read about it in this post reblogged from the BM… and there is a mention of ancient Egyptian music (just in case you are wondering!).

Bach’s Mass in B Minor, chants in praise of Vishnu in south India and the magnificent vocals and drums of qawwali music breaking like waves at a shrine in Pakistan. All these sounds are in praise of a deity – and show how music, all over the world, is used to elevate us from earthly…

via Music of the world: a symphony of cultures — The British Museum Blog

Set in Egypt: Assassin’s Creed: Origins

Personally I’m not into video games, but I thought some of my readers might be interested in an Egyptologist’s review of the 10th instalment of Assassin’s Creed, which is set in ancient Egypt. This is reblogged from Nile Scribes.

When Ubisoft announced that the sequel in their Assassin’s Creed series would be based in ancient Egypt, Egyptophiles around the world heard the news with much delight, including the Nile Scribes. Assassin’s Creed: Origins was released in October 2017, and our colleague, Emily Hotton, has written a review of the game for our blog.

Check out the full review via Game Review: Assassin’s Creed, Origins (Part 1) — Nile Scribes.  Enjoy!