Working on a rainy Monday

Today was a rainy and gloomy Monday… but a couple of things kept me busy all day so I barely noticed the rain. I spent most of the day reading applications submitted by university students interested in the curatorial internship I am offering at the museum next term.  Some candidates were excellent, others were excellent but not qualified in ancient studies and others were… well, not qualified at all.

One thing that bugged me today as I reviewed applications was that I had to refuse one–from  a student who was qualified and had a perfectly good application that was submitted on time–because their documentation was incomplete…. but through no fault of their own.  Because their professor never sent in their recommendation letter… Professors are busy, yes.  But if you’re too busy tell the student that you can’t do it so they can ask another prof who has less on their plate. That way their chances at an interesting learning opportunity won’t be ruined because of your tight schedule…  Frustrating.

The end of the day got a little more frustrating because our internet crashed and for an hour before I left I couldn’t send notices out to the students.  Instead, I changed task and looked up some references in archaeology journals to include in a peer review for an article I looked at this weekend.  I did find what I needed but because the internet was still out and it was 5pm, so I thought it was time to head out to the gym.   Now perhaps I should get back to that peer review….

Canada’s favourite ‘mummy hunter’ returns

Here is a lovely article in the St. Catharines Standard about my colleague and friend Gayle Gibson, Egyptologist and teacher extraordinaire, recently retired from the Royal Ontario Museum.  Follow the link to read the article: Canada’s favourite mummy hunter returns | St. Catharines Standard.

Gayle, this one is for you! Thanks for your support and friendship over the years.  Keep up the good work… even in retirement!  (Do Egyptologists ever really retire?)

Amenhotep III back on his feet

A statue of Amenhotep III has been put together again and raised back to his feet after it had toppled over during an earthquake…. more than 3000 years ago. You can read an article about this in Art Daily by clicking on the link.

Amenhotep III was an extremely prolific builder and there are numerous statues in His Majesty’s likeness still buried at his mortuary temple on the West Bank of Thebes, near Luxor.  I have a soft spot for this pharaoh… here’s a photo of yours truly at his feet. Literally.

At the feet of Amenhotep III

At the feet of Amenhotep III… a colossal statue of the king and his wife in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

Miniature Pyramids of Sudan

There is a nice article in Archaeology, the AIA magazine, on the Miniature Pyramids of Sudan, about fieldwork at Sedeinga. Actually, during my first dig season in Sudan back in 2000, I worked at the site with the French mission for one month (after spending the previous month with the Canadian mission at Meroe–see the Day in the life of an archaeologist chronicle). That is where I met my friend Vincent Francigny, who is now co-director of the excavations. Enjoy the article!