La vie en rose

Earlier this morning, the classical galleries were closed for ‘research and conservation.’  Bill, our chief conservator, and I were there to take samples of the bright pink pigment found on the South Italian ceramics.  We have a good idea of what this pigment might be but we’ll send samples to a colleague in Italy for scientific confirmation.

Sampling is always a delicate procedure because it is destructive.  Bill had to scrape some of that fabulous pink off the four vessels that use it in their decoration. We picked locations on the vessels that are less visible when you’re visiting the galleries and viewing the pots.  You shouldn’t notice where the pink pigment was scraped off.

The results will be published in the NCMA’s upcoming catalogue of classical art.

 

One last look at the marbles

Just before the holidays, Mark the marble guy dropped by the NCMA to take one last look at the classical marble sculptures before he could hand over his reports and catalogue entries. Again we had to work in the dark galleries of the museum, but luckily we didn’t have to start as late as before… the sun sets much sooner in winter!

Assisted by Caroline “the Younger” (who was my intern in the spring), we reexamined the troublesome Hercules and just a few other sculptures with Mark’s nifty and very powerful flashlight, his new portable microscope and under ultraviolet lights. We also took photographs (UV and VIL/IRR) of details based on our earlier “night at the museum” sessions.  This should be the last examination of the marbles and the research on these works of art is pretty much completed… but the project continues with the study of other ancient objects from different Classical cultures and made from different materials.

South Italy and Sicily: the research continues

The research on the NCMA’s classical collection continues and that is making me really, really happy. It might not be related to ancient Egypt or Nubia, but at least it’s ancient! Very late in November, our intellectual travels took us to South Italy and Sicily, where the ancient Greeks established colonies. Keely H, who is an expert on this material, took a look at the small collection from the art historical and archaeological standpoint; she was assisted by yours truly as well as Stacey, NCMA conservation technician. Objects conservator Corey was examining the collection from the conservation perspective.

The collection consists of various ceramic vessels, some of which are wonderfully coloured… but are all these pigments actually ancient?  That is the question!  We are trying to find the answer by looking at the objects under UV lights, by X-ray fluorescence (which was done by NCMA paintings conservator Noelle who is not on the photos), and hopefully even by sampling for further testing in later months.  Stay tuned for that!

Symposium on digital pedagogy and research

Today, I attended at Duke University’s Nasher Museum a symposium on Digital Pedagogy and Research in Art History, Archaeology & Visual Studies.  It was actually quite interesting (all the speakers were great) and there were presentations on mapping, apps for the study of ancient monuments (Hidden Florence) and works of art, 3D scanning of historic monuments, photogrammetry, the use of drones for imaging archaeological sites (notably at Aphrodisias) or the creation of algorithms for the removal of cradles on x-rays of paintings (a plugin called Platypus created by mathematicians and the conservators at the NCMA!) On top of that, we were well fed!

At the end of the day, I dropped by the Nasher’s galleries to take a look at their new interpretive app used to colour stone reliefs of four apostles–the colours were projected onto the reliefs.  It was actually quite fun to select portions of the figures and ‘paint’ them… and there were no restrictions about which colour to be used for the skin, hair, garments…  (The Met has something like this on the walls of the Temple of Dendur although I don’t know how interactive it is).

The NCMA is developing digital applications and 3D related distance learning opportunities.  I can’t talk about those right now, but just know that they involve my collections, so you’ll find out soon enough what we’re up to!  In the meantime, enjoy the pictures of today’s symposium.

 

Egyptian blue: more than just a colour

An interesting article (especially the last two paragraphs) about new uses of Egyptian blue, with which you should now be familiar if you’ve read some of my posts during the summer of 2014.  It’s not often that art comes to the aid of science; it’s usually the other way round. It was appeared in Chemistry World and Paul Brack won the 2014–15 Chemistry World science communication competition with this article.

Source: Egyptian blue: more than just a colour | Chemistry World

Chinese Terracotta Army

Today, I’m combining two chronicles—Did You Know? and ARCHAEO-Crush—using one group of artefacts: the Chinese Terracotta Army of Emperor Qin Shi Huang.
Did you know that on this day back in 1974 two local farmers in Xi’an came upon this incredible discovery while digging a well?  Archaeologists soon arrived to investigate and the rest is history…

Emperor Qin Shi Huang Di's terracotta army, intended to protect him in the Afterlife. (Photo taken by my Dad during his trip to Xian.)

Emperor Qin Shi Huang’s terracotta army, intended to protect him in the Afterlife. (Photo taken by my Dad during his trip to Xi’an.)

CHINESE TERRACOTTA ARMY
Type: artefact (funerary statuary)
Civilisation: ancient China
Date: 210–209 BCE
ARCHAEO-Crush: I love those terracotta warriors and other figures.  There are so many of them (more than 8000 soldiers, horses, chariots and non-military figures) and remarkably each one has individual features. There aren’t two alike! What I find utterly fascinating (and horrifying) is that the statues were fully painted, but in just a few minutes the pigments dry up and flake away with exposure to the dry air at the time of excavation. After much research, scientists and conservators have been able to consolidate the pigments with polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG200) and electron beam polymerization. I find conservation absolutely fascinating… You may have hear of PEG before as it is also used in the consolidation of water-logged wooden artefacts like Viking ships.
Bucket list status:  I have seen a selection of soldiers, chariots and horses in The First Emperor: China’sTerracotta Army, an exhibition held at the High Museum in Atlanta in 2008-09. I would definitely like to see them again, this time in China.  It’s at the top of my bucket list!
Additional info: UNESCO World Heritage 441
The science geeks interested in learning more about the conservation aspect can read the Getty’s 2010 Conservation of Ancient Sites along the Silk Road (PDF available online, at the virtual library on their website), which features a scientific article (pages 35-39) on the consolidation of the colour pigments of the terracotta army.

Pigment sampling

Now that we know there are traces of pigments on some of the Classical sculptures, it is time to take samples of all colours found on these objects. This task falls to Mark, who has to take minuscule samples of the pigments using the microscope or a head loupe to see them. Sampling will enable us to conduct further experiments (or have them conducted by a lab) to confirm the nature of the pigments with other scientific methods.