This IS the exhibition you’re looking for!

Earlier this afternoon, when I was doing research for a possible work trip to Naples, Italy, I came across this exhibition at the Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli:

The exhibition is about the mythology of heroes from Antiquity to Star Wars. (Brilliant, if you ask me…. the kid who thought that Alexander the Great was sort of an ancient Luke Skywalker–see an old post on the subject HERE.)  Unfortunately, the exhibition will be over by the time I make it to Naples in November, should the trip be possible (like said, exploring possibilities). The show closes on September 16.

Still, I was in stitches looking through the various photos of ancient art featuring Star Wars characters (some are more successful than others). Imagine, they used the same work of art I featured in my ‘Alexander Skywalker’ post… and added R2-D2 and BB8 to it. The MANN even had the guts to use some of the erotic art from Pompeii!!  (Talk about voyeuristic droids! These are not the droids you are looking for…)

My favourite are the two below. The geeks amongst you will enjoy the fact that you can download all these fun images from the exhibition website.

Sunken Cities: Egypt’s Lost Worlds

Today opens at the British Museum a new and very interesting exhibition: Sunken Cities: Egypt’s Lost Worlds.

Sunken below the waters of the Mediterranean for over 1000 years, the cities of Thonis-Heracleion and Canopus as well as their recently recovered underwater treasures are the subject of this blockbuster exhibition.  Not to be missed if you’re in London between 19 May and 27 November.

BM-sunkentreasures

So little time, so little Egyptology…

A new post has appeared on La Vida Aegyptiaca, my blog on the Society for the Study of Egyptian Antiquities (SSEA).  I have done very little Egyptology these last few months because, since January, I’m working on an exhibition that opens this October 1. (Yep, just 10 months to complete project that would normally be given 2 years.)  Take a look at my post using the link above… and keep in mind the image below.  That’s what I’ve been working on… there’s been so little Egyptology in my life since the New Year.  I take where I can…

DSCN4625

1936 Stout Scarab (detail)

 

Behind the Scenes: The Repatriation of Stolen Objects | American Research Center in Egypt

Have  you ever heard of Operation Mummy’s Curse?  Find out all about it in this interesting short article on the American Research Center in Egypt website.

Source: Behind the Scenes: The Repatriation of Stolen Objects | American Research Center in Egypt

Installing Oplontis

My spring is already crazy, but I hope to have time to go see this exhibition….  I got the invitation in the mail a little while ago.

The Kelsey Blog

BY CAROLINE ROBERTS, Conservator, Kelsey Museum of Archaeology

For the past four weeks it has been all hands on deck at the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. Indeed, it has taken the entire Kelsey village – curators, registrars, conservators, educators, and exhibit coordinators – to bring Oplontis to life.

The first step in installing Oplontis was to receive the objects. Over 30 crates of artifacts arrived from Italy nearly five weeks ago. Kelsey collections managers were at the Museum (very) early in the morning to oversee the movement of the crates from truck to loading dock to gallery. The crates were allowed to adjust to the climate of the Kelsey galleries for about a day before being opened.

Oplontis 3 The Nike sculpture travels from the first to the second floor galleries

Our next step was to unpack and install the artifacts. We did this with the help of two couriers, Giuseppe…

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Investigating Agatha Christie

Are you looking for a little something archaeological to do with the family during the Holidays? If yes, the Montréal Museum of Archaeology and History is presenting an interesting exhibition about Agatha Christie and archaeology.  Indeed, the Queen of crime is intimately linked to archaeology: not only did she used several important historical and archaeological sites in a number of novels, she also was married to archaeologist Sir Max Mallowan, whom she accompanied on excavations in Mesopotamia.

Excerpts about the exhibition from the Museum’s website:

Pointe-à-Callière is mounting Investigating Agatha Christie, an original exhibition focusing on an exceptional woman whose unusual life and compelling novels left their mark on international literature. The exhibition, to run from December 8, 2015 to April 17, 2016, will look at Agatha Christie through her work, her imagination and her world, including archaeology. It is one of the major international events planned to mark the 125th anniversary of the famous novelist’s birth, on September 15, 1890.

Christie drew heavily on archaeology and history as inspiration for many of her famous novels, including Murder in Mesopotamia, They Came to Baghdad, Appointment with Death and Death Comes as the End. She also described daily life on dig sites in a fascinating little book entitled Come, Tell Me How You Live. She wrote that an archaeologist and a detective have much in common: both must come to understand an event (recent or in the distant past) using their observation skills and clues that are brought to light, piecing them together and relying on a bit of luck, too!

No wonder many archaeologists are fans of Christie’s novels!  Indeed, I count myself amongst them: I am quite fond of Hercule Poirot (slowly but surely, I have been re-reading all the Poirot stories in order). I’m very much tempted to go see this exhibition. Perhaps I might have time during the holiday…

Mother’s Day Tour

After my Sacred Motherhood exhibition closed in early December, I got several requests from docent and visitors alike for a checklist of the artwork so they could create their own tour on this theme. This got me thinking and, after consulting with blog editor Karen K, I created an illustrated and captioned self-guided tour of the permanent galleries using the works of art that were in the exhibition and adding a couple of others.

The slide show post entitled Create Your Own Mother’s Day Tour was posted on Circa, the Museum blog, earlier in the week and I immediately received comments from volunteers and docents saying they were very excited about creating their own tour. In fact, the blog post got picked up by WRAL.com’s Go Ask Mom chronicle as a suggestion of something to do this Mother’s Day weekend. Cool, huh?

Happy Mother’s Day!