New links about Nubia

There is a new page in the Links section where you’ll find material to explore about Nubia. Just select Nubiology from the drop-down menu.

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A Visit to Meroe

When I came home from work, there was a nice little surprise in my mailbox: a small but thick envelope from Krzys, my former thesis supervisor. I knew immediately what it was and grabbed my letter opener to open the letter quickly. Inside I found a lovely booklet—with colour pictures on glossy pages—about the archaeological site of Meroe (pronounced MAY-roe-ay) in Sudan. It is a visitors’ guide to the site, which is close enough to Khartoum to do as a day trip (tiring, but feasible). I worked at Meroe with Krzys during my graduate studies and the Great Amun Temple found there was part of my doctoral dissertation (which was on Amun temples in Nubia, published in 2008 by Archaeopress).

It’s pouring down with rain at the moment, so I think I will make myself a cup of tea and read ‘A Visit to Meroe, the Ancient Royal Capital.

(Thanks for the booklet, Krzys!)

A photo I took of the Great Amun Temple of Meroe in November 2000 (it's been a while!).

A photo I took of the Great Amun Temple of Meroe in November 2000 (it’s been a while!).

Emory’s Art and Archaeology of Ancient Nubia online course

Taught by my colleague Peter Lacovara, this online course offered by Coursera and Emory University “examines the development of the art and architecture of the cultures of ancient Nubia through what we have learned from archaeology and how that evidence has helped us create the picture we now have of the culture and history of the birth and development of art and civilization in the Nile Valley.”
(I may have had a little something to do with it, too.)

The above description of the course, course syllabus and more information, can be found here. The course starts on April 30.

A book in a book

Yesterday, I had to check something in the Louvre’s exhibition catalogue Meroe, Empire on the Nile. We got this superb publication a while ago, but I never had the chance to really read any parts of it.  So, I sat to read a couple of the essays and imagine my surprise when, in one of them, I saw my book on Amun temples mentioned in the references! (Actually, it’s the book listed on Amazon as having been published in 1850, see the OMG! LOL! post dated February 27.)

In a way, I should not be surprised. My book is indeed relevant to the topic presented in the essay. I guess I’m still early enough in my career to be tickled by having other scholars mention my own work in theirs.